texas dulcimer

texas dulcimer1 texas dulcimer2 texas dulcimer3

The Collin Street Bakery puts fruit cake in some pretty swell cookie tins, but not all of them have a blue lid and historical scenes on the sides. This is a dulcimer or dulcitar with four strings and a diatonic scale. It can be tuned and played lots of ways but typically only two strings are pressed to the frets and the remaining two are drones.

  • tin dimensions: 7 1/8 x 2 3/4 inches
  • scale length: 500 mm, 19 5/8 inches
  • head to tail 675mm, 26 5/8 inches
  • G .008, C .013, G .008, G .008
  • maple neck
  • mahogany fret board
  • diatonic scale
  • acrylic neck tie strap
  • black friction tuning pegs

Sorry folks, this instrument is taken. It is on its way to a new home for lots of easy porch strumming on summer evenings.

 

yellow rose

old rose 1

old rose 2

This tin still had the scent of perfumed powder inside when I started with it. It’s little, but it can sing. This is a dulcimer or dulcitar with four strings and a diatonic scale. It can be tuned and played lots of ways but typically only two strings are pressed to the frets and the remaining two are drones.

  • 5 1/2 x 3 1/4 inch tin
  • scale length: 500 mm, 19 5/8 in.
  • head to tail: 670 mm, 26 1/4 in.
  • strings: G .008, C .013, G .008, G .008  plain steel, loop end
  • maple neck
  • mahogany fret board
  • silk neck tie strap

All for $160, such a deal! Send me a message if you are interested.

maker faire san luis obispo 2013

three at Maker Faire

At the mini Maker Faire 2013 I had a swell time showing folks how to play a ukulele, dulcimer, or canjo (and quite a few folks who needed no showing at all). It was my first time out in public with these instruments and I actually sold a few! People seemed to like the novelty of getting sound out of a funny looking can and some were impressed that they actually sounded good.

MFSLO8

For more images have a look at Flickr.

MFSLO9

MFSLO17

MFSLO18

A big, “Thank you.” to everyone who came by and tried a strum or two, and a double, “Thank you.” to the folks who made a purchase. It has encouraged me to keep pounding the steel.

the first one


In 2009 after making a cigar box ukulele (using a neck from a toy guitar) I built my first instrument from scratch. I had seen photos of canjos and other instruments with metal can bodies and I had a swell 10 inch cookie tin just itching to be made into something new. The neck is scrap maple picture frame stock, the frets are improvised brass flat-stock, and the tin bottom was flat. The odd can noises this instrument added to the strings (you can hear it “bark” in the short video) prompted me to try my hand at shaping a resonator out of the can bottom for later instruments. This instrument has since been reworked and now has a shaped tin bottom, a better bridge, and a more predictable sound. The frets are set in a diatonic scale and it is strung like a mountain dulcimer. It is fun and easy to play. I still have this one around but I would be embarrassed to sell it. It’s just too funky, even with the retrofitted body.