big green

 

big green 1 big green 2 big green 3Big Green was the first ukulele I built with a big tin. This one is 9.75 inches in diameter and it makes for a nice big voice. The scattered bird’s eyes of the fret board were a surprise. They popped out of an odd piece of stock and just asked to be a fret board. The result prompted me to seek out nice pieces of wood for fret boards. Up to this instrument I had made do with plain old maple.

  • tin: 9 3/4 x 3 1/2in.
  • scale length: 380 mm, 15 in.
  • head to tail: 660 mm, 26 in.
  • G .010, C .015, E .011, A .008
  • maple neck
  • maple fret board with a wee bit of bird’s eye
  • stainless fork and rest
  • patchwork strap

Sorry folks, Big Green sold to a SLO local July 22, 2014.

hope tambourine

tamborine1 tamborine2 tamborine3

Percussion and twang all in one instrument.

  • tin dimensions: 8 x 3 3/8 inches
  • scale length: 390 mm, 15 3/8 inches
  • head to tail: 630 mm, 24 3/4 inches
  • G .010, C .015, E .011, A .008
  • maple neck
  • padauk fret board
  • silk neck tie strap
  • open head tuning machines
  • five sets of tambourine bells

All for just $200. Sorry folks, this one has been promised to the San Luis Obispo Classical Academy for their 2014 annual fund raising auction on March 15th.

 

pomegranate

pom2pom1 pom3

Good ol’ pomegranate helped me work out so much about shaping cookie tins and nailed down lots of technique in January of 2011. She was not my first really successful ukulele but was next in line. This one proved I could do it a again.

  • tin dimensions: 7 3/4 x 2 1/4 inches
  • scale length: 390 mm, 15 3/4 inches
  • head to tail: 650 mm, 25 1/2 inches
  • G .010, C ,015, E .011, A .008
  • maple neck and fret board
  • stainless fork and bobbin
  • open head tuning machines
  • patchwork strap

Sorry folks, Pomegranate was snapped up at the San Luis Obispo Maker Faire May 10, 2014. It is now in the hands of a lucky budding uke musician.

goldie

goldie1 goldie2 goldie3

Old goldie was built in March of 2011. That makes her one of the early ones, but she plays a lovely steel twang on a concert uke scale.

  • tin dimensions: 7 3/4 x 2 1/4 inches
  • scale length: 390 mm, 15 3/8 inches
  • head to tail: 615 mm, 24 1/4 inches
  • G .010, C .015, E .011, A .008
  • maple neck and fret board
  • sterling fork and arm rest
  • open head tuning machines

This one went as a gift to a friend of my sister. I’m sure Goldie will be twanging in his hands for many happy years to come.

 

electric blue

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This ukulele, built in October of 2012, was an experiment in several ways. I toyed with staining the fret board (with bad effect) so it looks funny but I like it anyhow. It has a nice voice and has been my test rig for building pickup coils. No demo video with electric sound yet but stay tuned. Tinkering with coil pickups in these cookie tin instruments has been easy. The coil doesn’t need to interfere with the strings as the body is steel and a coil or set of coils can pick up sound anywhere on the inside of the tin. There is no need for shielding as the tin, grounded by the jack, is effectively a Faraday cage. Though I would be loth to sell this instrument due to its odd looks don’t hesitate to contact me if you are interested in plugging in a cookie tin. For more about electrified cookie tin instruments take a look at the electric link in the top menu.

  • tin: 7 1/2 x 2 5/8 inch
  • scale length: 390 mm, 15 3/8 inches
  • head to tail: 635 mm, 25 inches
  • G .010, C .015, E .011, A .008
  • maple neck and fret board
  • two hand wound coil pickups and 1/4 inch output jack

burnt orange lefty

burnt orange1 burnt orange2 burnt orange3This lefty concert scale ukulele was completed in June of 2013 and has such a mellow voice I wish I played left handed. You can see in the video below that I switched to playing right handed but turned the chords upside down just to make a decent demonstration. This is the third left handed instrument I have built. The first was for my special lady friend, and the second was for my sister’s beau. I’m always up for making more as custom orders, so contact me if you want a lefty but don’t like this tin… but I’m telling you this one is very sweet.

  • tin: 7 1/2 x 2 3/4 in.
  • scale length: 380 mm, 15 in.
  • head to tail: 620 mm, 24 1/4 in.
  • G .010, C .015, E .011, A .008
  • maple neck
  • cocobolo fret board
  • sterling fork and rest
  • silk neck tie strap

All for just $300. Contact me if you are interested.

big tex blue

big tex blue1 big tex blue2 big tex blue3Ah, she is a beauty. Completed in June 2013, big tex was built with one of my favorite sorts of tins. This is my third concert scale ukulele using a Collin Street Bakery tin with the double Texas Bluebonnet on the lid, but this is the first and only one using the big ten inch tin. It’s got a loud voice and a loud neck tie strap.

  • tin: 10 x 3 1/4 in.
  • scale: 380 mm, 15 in.
  • head to tail: 650 mm, 25 1/4 in.
  • G .010, C .015, E .011, A .008
  • maple neck
  • cocobolo fret board
  • silk neck tie strap

This instrument was snapped up by a resident the great state of Texas as a tin wedding anniversary gift (that’s the 10th anniversary in case you were wondering). Thanks again D. Your purchase made all this fooling around so much more worth it.

big danish

danish1
This instrument was a favorite to play as soon as I completed it. It has a big brash sound due to its extra large tin.

      • 10 1/4 x 4 1/4 inch tin
      • scale length: 385 mm, 15 1/8 in. (concert ukulele)
      • head to tail: 645 mm, 25 1/2 in.
      • strings: G .010, C .015, E .011, A .008  steel, loop end
      • maple neck
      • cocobolo fretboard
      • silk necktie strap
      • silver plate string anchor and arm rest

She’s all yours for just $160. Send me a message if you are interested.

danish3

You can see the back of the tin here. It’s the one in the middle.

danish2

faux cloisonné

fauxcloisonne3The tin for this ukulele had an odd shaped bottom and I was not certain it would lend itself to making an instrument. In the end, hammering the steel went well and resulted in a nice voice. I used padouk wood for the fretboard and maple for the neck. Add a swell neck tie for a strap and you have a fine little instrument that was snapped up by a family that visited tinkers damn at the San Luis Obispo Mini Maker Faire in May 2013.fauxcloisonne fauxcloisonne2

plain steel

plainsteel1 plainsteel3This unpainted steel tin (from the bargain bin at Michaels) became a nice ukulele with a brash voice. It lives in the hinterlands now, and is played on summer nights by the campfire entertainer at a Wyoming dude ranch. The body is 9 1/2 inches in diameter, the neck and fret board are all maple, the strap pin is a bobbin, and the string anchor and arm rest are sterling silver. plainsteel2